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Involving Stakeholders and Communicating Findings

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Practice Advice in Evaluation and Performance Measurement

Involving Stakeholders and Communicating Findings (OECD)

Description: Stakeholders, including staff, can be appointed to evaluation commissions or involved through steering or advisory groups.

Commentary: 

  • Participatory evaluation methods can be used to create consensus and ownership for a change process. Dialogue with users and staff improves understanding and responsiveness to their needs and priorities. Participation must be managed due to the costs, time constraints and the risk of capture from such processes.
  • Presenting evaluation findings openly increases credibility and creates pressure to act upon findings. Public availability of reports and meetings are useful to present and stimulate dialogue on findings. Judgements and recommendations based on clear criteria attract attention and promote subsequent action. Judgements should focus on overcoming problems rather than on assigning blame.

Source: OECD (1998) Best Practice Guidelines For Evaluation at http://www.oecd.org/governance/budgetingandpublicexpenditures/1902965.pdf (accessed 23 November, 2012).

Page Created By: Matthew Seddon on 23 November 2012. Updated by Ian Clark on 2 January 2013. The content presented on this page is drawn directly from the source(s) cited above, and consists of direct quotations or close paraphrases. This material does not necessarily reflect the official view of the publishing organization.

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