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Anti-Corruption and Democratic Governance

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Practice Advice on Democratic Institutions and Policy Process

Anti-Corruption and Democratic Governance (UNDP)

Summary Advice: The UNDP advises that corruption undermines democratic governance and the equitable delivery of public services.  The UNDP has identified a number of strategies to minimize corruption within state institutions and political processes. These measures can help enhance the level of effectiveness, efficiency and equity in the generation, allocation and management of resources.

Main Points: Several of the best practices identified by UNDP as means to limit corruption are:

  • Create inclusive, responsive and accountable political processes to efficiently and effectively deliver social services to everyone, including the poor and marginalized.
  • Mainstreaming anti-corruption in reform and other development initiatives.
  • Improve nationally owned anti-corruption assessments and measurements.
  • Improve anti-corruption institutions, including their anti-corruption strategies and plans.
  • Improve anti-corruption measures in service delivery sectors (e.g. health, education, and water and sanitation).
  • Improve the capacity of media and civil society groups in order to strengthen their oversight role.
  • Generate and share anti-corruption knowledge, lessons learned, good practices, trends and emerging issue.

Source: UNDP "Fast Facts: Anti-Corruption and Democratic Governance (November 2011), P1." at http://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/corporate/fast-facts/english/FF-Anti-Corruption.pdf (accessed 28 December 2012).

Page Created By: Ruby Dagher on 28 December 2012. Updated by Ian Clark on 2 January 2013. The content presented on this page is drawn directly from the source(s) cited above, and consists of direct quotations or close paraphrases. This material does not necessarily reflect the official view of the publishing organization.

 

 


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