Skip to main content

Differentiating Public Subsidies among University Programs

Go Search
Home
About
New Atlas
Atlas, A-Z
Atlas Maps
MPP/MPA Programs
Subjects
Core Topics
Illustrative Courses
Topic Encyclopedia
Concept Dictionary
Competencies
Career Tips
IGOs
Best Practices Project


 

Practice Advice on Education Policy

Differentiating Public Subsidies among University Programs (OECD advice for Greece)

Description: The OECD reccomends that countries (or the responsible level of government) establish broad principles to differentiate levels of public subsidies across programs in the higher education sector.

Commentary: Some of the principles recommended by the OECD for differentiating levels of public subsidy across programs are:

  • Higher levels of subsidy should be provided to highly relevant fields. Lower levels of subsidy should be provided to popular programs, and programs that have high private returns to graduates.
  • All new academic programmes should be assessed for relevance in terms of labour market needs - this process should inform decisions concerning the level of public subsidy for each program.
  • Ensuring the relevance to society of both new and existing programs requires a robust system of quality assurance.

Source: OECD (2011). Education Policy Advice for Greece, Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education, at
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264119581-en (accessed 2 January 2013).

Page Created By: Khilola B. Zakhidova on 11 November 2012. Updated by Ian Clark on 2 January 2013. The content presented on this page is drawn directly from the source(s) cited above, and consists of direct quotations or close paraphrases. This material does not necessarily reflect the official view of the publishing organization.

 

 Concepts relevant to this Best Practice

There are currently no favorite links to display.

 Other Best Practices relevant to this Best Practice

There are currently no favorite links to display.

 Other Resources relevant to this Best Practice

There are currently no favorite links to display.

Important Notices
© University of Toronto 2008
School of Public Policy and Governance