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OECD Competencies and Job Descriptions

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Competencies in Public Policy and Management

OECD Core Competencies and Selected Job Descriptions

The OECD is a quintessential employer of graduates of MPP and MPA programs. The OECD Careers website provides links to job descriptions and the Competency Framework Booklet (downloaded file in Documents block below), parts of which are reproduced below.

Source: OECD at http://www.oecd.org/careers/Competency%20framework_booklet.pdf accessed 21 January 2014  

 Documents

OECD_Competency_Framework_booklet.pdfOECD_Competency_Framework_booklet

 OECD Job Descriptions

  Economist/Policy Analyst - Governance

 

OECD CORE COMPETENCIES

The OECD Competency framework comprises core competencies which are presented in three clusters as shown below. The blue cluster groups the delivery related competencies, the purple has interpersonal competencies and green relates to strategic competencies.

WHAT ARE CORE COMPETENCIES?

Core Competencies can be defined as personal attributes or underlining characteristics, which combined with technical or professional skills, enable the delivery of a role/job. Competencies state the expected areas and levels of performance, tell us what is valued and rewarded.

Other factors such as personal values, motivation and type of work also play their part in job performance that are likely to feature in discussions between staff and managers.

The Core Competencies do not define our technical roles and accountabilities, nor does it include the technical skills necessary to do our jobs. These are found in the Technical competency section, many of which have been or are in the process of being developed for each job family.

The OECD Core Competencies are an outline which is consistent across the organisation and helps identify the types of behaviours the Organisation wishes to promote, develop and is keen to engender.

Each of the core competencies has the following components:

Competency definition - explains what the core competency means. For example: Influencing is described as - an intention to convince others in an honest, respectful and sensitive manner in order to get them to go along with one’s objectives, or the desire to have a specific impact or effect on others.  

Behavioural indicators - are examples that indicate how an individual can demonstrate that competency. Behaviour indicators are designed to show what effective performance looks like. All indicators are not always all applicable to a job role. 

Competency levels - each competency also has five levels*, attached to the current grading structure for a matter of clarity - which make using the behavioural indicators simple.

The levels allow us to be quite specific in determining what is required for a given role or situation, allowing us to clearly focus our discussions and development efforts for the greatest improvement in performance.

*Some levels include more than one grade. In such a case, the level of competency described reflects the upper end of the grade.

The following pages set out all fifteen of the competencies and the behaviours expected at each level

[NOTE: THIS PAGE INCLUDES JUST THE FIRST TWO OF THE FIFTEEN]

Title: Analytical Thinking

Description: Analytical Thinking is the ability to identify patterns between situations that are not obviously related and to identify key or underlying issues in complex situations.

Levels

Grades

Key Indicators

5

A5-A7

 

Is sought by others for advice and solutions to make best interpretation and usage of information

Discerns the level of importance to apply in each aspect of the analysis in relation to the broader context.

4

A4

 

 Develops conceptual frameworks that guide analysis

Draws sound conclusions based upon a mixture of analysis and experience.

3

A1-A3

L1-L3

 

 Independently engages in tasks requiring interpretation of complex and often vague sets of information.

Identifies gaps in information and makes assumptions in order to continue the analysis and/or take action.

 Seeks for a wide range of sources of information.

2

B4-B6

C5-C6

 

 Identifies critical connections and patterns in information/data.

 Analyses soundly verbal and numerical data

Recognises causes and consequences of actions and events that are not readily apparent.

 Anticipates and thinks ahead about next steps.

1

B1-B3

C1-C4

 

 Distinguishes between critical and irrelevant pieces of information.

Gathers input / information from a few different sources to reach a conclusion.

Title: Flexible Thinking

Description: Flexible Thinking involves the ability to adapt to a variety of situations, individuals or groups effectively. It is based on the ability to understand and appreciate different and opposing perspectives on an issue, to adapt an approach as the requirements of a situation change, and to change or easily accept changes in one’s own organisation or job requirements.

Levels

Grades

Key Indicators

5

A5-A7

 

 Is intellectually agile in response to challenges of internal and external environments;

Solicits ideas and responds positively to those from staff, committees and Secretary-General.

4

A4

 

 Contributes to shaping business practices and policies

 Shares new ideas and perspectives to adjust business strategies

 Encourages others to see the positive outcome of doing things differently

3

A1-A3

L1-L3

 

Seeks for best practices inside and outside the Organisation to anticipate change

Stays open-minded and encourages others to bring new perspectives.

2

B4-B6

C5-C6

 

 Anticipates having to adapt work methods to changing technology and environment

 Considers problems from all new perspectives and can expand on the thinking or solutions proposed by others.

 Adapts to new ideas and initiatives relevant to own area of work

Understands and promotes the Organisation’s business needs and policies for introducing change

1

B1-B3

C1-C4

 

 Proposes ways to do things differently.

Understands and recognizes the value of other points of view and ways of doing things.

Displays a positive attitude in the face of ambiguity and change.

 


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© University of Toronto 2008
School of Public Policy and Governance