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United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

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PPGPortal > Home > Concept Dictionary > T, U, V > United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
 
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

Adopted in 1992 by more than 150 countries, its ultimate objective is “‘stabilisation of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system."

(Solomon, S. et al. (eds.) (2007). Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved on July 5, 2008, from
http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/ar4-wg1.htm.)

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The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was adopted on 9 May 1992 in New York and signed at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro by more than 150 countries and the European Community. Its ultimate objective is the “‘stabilisation of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”. It contains commitments for all parties. Under the UNFCCC, parties included in Annex I (all OECD countries and countries with economies in transition) aim to return greenhouse gas emissions not controlled by the Montreal Protocol to 1990 levels by the year 2000. The convention entered in force in March 1994.
     
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

Adopted in 1992 by more than 150 countries, its ultimate objective is “‘stabilisation of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system."

(Solomon, S. et al. (eds.) (2007). Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved on July 5, 2008, from
http://www.ipcc.ch/ipccreports/ar4-wg1.htm.)

---------------------------------

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was adopted on 9 May 1992 in New York and signed at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro by more than 150 countries and the European Community. Its ultimate objective is the “‘stabilisation of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system”. It contains commitments for all parties. Under the UNFCCC, parties included in Annex I (all OECD countries and countries with economies in transition) aim to return greenhouse gas emissions not controlled by the Montreal Protocol to 1990 levels by the year 2000. The convention entered in force in March 1994.

Approved for glossaryposting by Ben Eisen on March 20, 2011


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