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Turnover (Human Resource Management)

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PPGPortal > Home > Concept Dictionary > T, U, V > Turnover (Human Resource Management)
 

Turnover (Human Resource Management)

A rate at which workers move into and out of employment.

(Demographic Analysis of the Federal Public Service Workforce – HR Concepts and Definitions, Library and Archives Canada, http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/*/http://www.psagency-agencefp.gc.ca/hr-rh/psds-dfps/dafps_lex_e.asp , Visited on October 15, 2009.)

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Often expressed as a percentage based on the number of employees entering and leaving an organization during a certain time over the average number of employees in the organization during the same period.

A general term often used in labour economics to describe the sum total of employee inflows (new recruits) and outflows (separations) within an organization.

For instance, a firm with high labour turnover in one or several occupations (i.e. newly hired staff are leaving soon afterwards) is said to be undergoing one of the following:

1.      The firm experiencing retention problems
2.      The firm is experiencing difficulty in recruiting competent staff

There is no simple method of calculating labour turnover. If both hiring and separation rates are equally high in your organization in the case of certain occupations, then one can posit that when referring to those specific occupations, labour turnover is high. It is often as synonyms to “degrees of retention”.

     

Turnover (Human Resource Management)

A rate at which workers move into and out of employment.

(Demographic Analysis of the Federal Public Service Workforce – HR Concepts and Definitions, Library and Archives Canada, http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/*/http://www.psagency-agencefp.gc.ca/hr-rh/psds-dfps/dafps_lex_e.asp , Visited on October 15, 2009.)

---------------------------------

Often expressed as a percentage based on the number of employees entering and leaving an organization during a certain time over the average number of employees in the organization during the same period.

A general term often used in labour economics to describe the sum total of employee inflows (new recruits) and outflows (separations) within an organization.

For instance, a firm with high labour turnover in one or several occupations (i.e. newly hired staff are leaving soon afterwards) is said to be undergoing one of the following:

1.      The firm experiencing retention problems
2.      The firm is experiencing difficulty in recruiting competent staff

There is no simple method of calculating labour turnover. If both hiring and separation rates are equally high in your organization in the case of certain occupations, then one can posit that when referring to those specific occupations, labour turnover is high. It is often as synonyms to “degrees of retention”.


Approved for glossaryposting by Ben Eisen on February 27, 2011


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