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Triple-E Senate

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PPGPortal > Home > Concept Dictionary > T, U, V > Triple-E Senate
 
Triple-E Senate

The term “Triple-E Senate” refers to a Senate which is elected, equal, and effective.

(Aucoin, 2006, p.25)

---------------------------------

The term “Triple-E Senate” has been used to refer to the Australian Senate, which means: (i) elected, and therefore legitimate; (ii) equal, in terms of the representation of the Australian states; and (iii) effective, in countering the Government’s control of the House of Representatives.

It has also been the dominant reform model for the Canadian Senate as popularized by the Reform Party of Canada.

References

Stein, Michael. Class Lecture. PPG 1000 Governance and Institutions. University of Toronto School of Public Policy and Governance. 2007.

Aucoin, Peter. (2006). Naming, Blaming and Shaming: Improving government accountability in light of Gomery. Breakfast on the Hill Seminar Series.
     
Triple-E Senate

The term “Triple-E Senate” refers to a Senate which is elected, equal, and effective.

(Aucoin, 2006, p.25)

---------------------------------

The term “Triple-E Senate” has been used to refer to the Australian Senate, which means: (i) elected, and therefore legitimate; (ii) equal, in terms of the representation of the Australian states; and (iii) effective, in countering the Government’s control of the House of Representatives.

It has also been the dominant reform model for the Canadian Senate as popularized by the Reform Party of Canada.

References

Stein, Michael. Class Lecture. PPG 1000 Governance and Institutions. University of Toronto School of Public Policy and Governance. 2007.

Aucoin, Peter. (2006). Naming, Blaming and Shaming: Improving government accountability in light of Gomery. Breakfast on the Hill Seminar Series.

Approved for glossaryposting by Ben Eisen on February 27, 2011


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© University of Toronto 2008
School of Public Policy and Governance