Skip to main content

Transnational Economy

Go Search
Home
About
New Atlas
Atlas, A-Z
Atlas Maps
MPP/MPA Programs
Subjects
Core Topics
Illustrative Courses
Topic Encyclopedia
Concept Dictionary
Competencies
Career Tips
IGOs
Best Practices Project


 
PPGPortal > Home > Concept Dictionary > T, U, V > Transnational Economy
 
Transnational Economy

A system of economic activities for which state territories and frontiers are not the basic framework, but merely complicating factors, a "world economy" is the extreme case.

(Hobsbawm, E. (1994). Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century, 1914-1991. London: Michael Joseph, p.277.)

---------------------------------

Transnational economy refers to a system of economic activities for which state territories and state frontiers are not the basic framework, but merely complicating factors. In the extreme case, a “world economy” comes into existence which actually has no specifiable territorial base or limits, and which determines, or rather sets to, what even the economies of very large and powerful states can do.

Three aspects of economic transnationalization were particularly obvious: transnational firms (often known as “multinationals”); the new international division of labour; and the rise of offshore finance.
     
Transnational Economy

A system of economic activities for which state territories and frontiers are not the basic framework, but merely complicating factors, a "world economy" is the extreme case.

(Hobsbawm, E. (1994). Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century, 1914-1991. London: Michael Joseph, p.277.)

---------------------------------

Transnational economy refers to a system of economic activities for which state territories and state frontiers are not the basic framework, but merely complicating factors. In the extreme case, a “world economy” comes into existence which actually has no specifiable territorial base or limits, and which determines, or rather sets to, what even the economies of very large and powerful states can do.

Three aspects of economic transnationalization were particularly obvious: transnational firms (often known as “multinationals”); the new international division of labour; and the rise of offshore finance.

Approved for glossaryposting by Ben Eisen on February 27, 2011


Important Notices
© University of Toronto 2008
School of Public Policy and Governance