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Strategic Human Resources Management (SHRM)

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PPGPortal > Home > Concept Dictionary > S > Strategic Human Resources Management (SHRM)
 
Strategic Human Resources Management (SHRM)

The ongoing efforts of an organization to align its personnel policies and practices with its business strategy.

(Tompkins, Jonathan. (2002). Strategic human resources management in government: Unresolved issues. Public Personnel Management, Vol. 31, Spring 2002, 95-110.)

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SHRM is a conceptual framework that "merges strategic planning and human resources management" as well as a " continuous process of determining mission-related objectives and aligning personnel policies and practices with these objectives."

Tompkins maintains that there are many unresolved issues pertaining to SHRM, and that, if SHRM is to survive as an organizational concept, these outstanding must be addressed effectively. He proposes that in addition to clearly defining SHRM as a concept, less emphasis must be placed on strategic planning. Instead, ‘the personnel office, in addition to helping the agency implement strategic initiatives, also carries out an integrated personnel program guided by a coherent theory about what it should be doing and why.”
     
Strategic Human Resources Management (SHRM)

The ongoing efforts of an organization to align its personnel policies and practices with its business strategy.

(Tompkins, Jonathan. (2002). Strategic human resources management in government: Unresolved issues. Public Personnel Management, Vol. 31, Spring 2002, 95-110.)

---------------------------------

SHRM is a conceptual framework that "merges strategic planning and human resources management" as well as a " continuous process of determining mission-related objectives and aligning personnel policies and practices with these objectives."

Tompkins maintains that there are many unresolved issues pertaining to SHRM, and that, if SHRM is to survive as an organizational concept, these outstanding must be addressed effectively. He proposes that in addition to clearly defining SHRM as a concept, less emphasis must be placed on strategic planning. Instead, ‘the personnel office, in addition to helping the agency implement strategic initiatives, also carries out an integrated personnel program guided by a coherent theory about what it should be doing and why.”

Approved for glossaryposting by Ben Eisen on January 14, 2011


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