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PPGPortal > Home > Concept Dictionary > R > Regulation
 

Regulation 

The generic category of policy instruments that rely on the government's capacity to command and prohibit.

(Pal, 2006, p. 183; Government of Canada, 2007a, p. 2 )

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The generic category of policy instruments that rely on the government's capacity to command and prohibit. Pal defines regulation as: “the generic category of policy instruments that rely on the government's capacity to command and prohibit.”

The generic category of policy instruments that rely on the government's capacity to command and prohibit. The Government of Canada defines regulation as: Regulations are a form of law—they have binding legal effect and usually set out rules that apply generally, rather than to specific persons or situations. Often referred to as “delegated” or “subordinate legislation,” regulations are made by persons to whom or bodies to which Parliament has delegated authority, such as Cabinet (the Governor in Council), a minister, or an administrative agency. Authority to make regulations must be expressly delegated through enabling legislation.

The generic category of policy instruments that rely on the government's capacity to command and prohibit.The term may be used at three levels: 1) referring to all mechanisms of social control, 2) aggregating forms of how the state steers the economy, or 3) as a set of rules, often with some administrative agencies, monitoring and enforcing compliance (i.e. as standards and rules backed by authority).

References 

Pal, L. (2006). Beyond Policy Analysis: Public Issue Management in Turbulent Times. Third Edition. Toronto: Nelson – Thomson.

Government of Canada (2007a). Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation. Retrieved on June 9, 2008, from http://www.regulation-reglementation.gc.ca/directive/directive-eng.pdf

     

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